Oh So Anthropological

Your source for all things Anthropology

4,369 notes

sarahsaysmd:

In med school, taking notes is hard because there’s SO much material. I remember going through one of my lectures and wondering how the hell I was going to simplify it to something I could actually remember. I usually make what are called “study sheets” after each lecture, and this is how I do them!

  • If there’s learning objectives, follow those. Use them to guide your notes. If there’s not, then use your intuition (based on what was heavily emphasized or covered the most) to figure out where to focus your notetaking. Just make sure you’ve organized everything in your head before putting it down to paper, because notes only work if they’re clear! 
  • Use categories to break up your learning. In one lecture there’s often multiple components, so I use headings to separate the main points. That way they don’t all blur together in my head.
  • Whenever possible, make charts, diagrams, or drawings. I can’t tell you the amount of times I’ve remembered something on a test because I took the time to draw it out! If you’re a kinesthetic or visual learner, this is super helpful. It really simplifies the material and organizes it thoroughly. It’s much easier to study from a clear chart than a block of text.
  • When you do use text, keep it concise. Use different colors to write out key phrases and terms, and try not to write out paragraphs and paragraphs. Sometimes, it unavoidable, and you need a lot of text to understand a key concept. Short and sweet wherever possible, though, makes life easier for you! 
  • Transform, transform, transform. Always try to put things in your own words wherever you can. Manipulate the material so that it coincides with what you’ve learned. When you think about a topic from multiple perspectives, you understand it a million times better.
  • When reviewing notes, read them aloud! Sometimes, I cover up one section and say everything I can remember about it. Then I check to see if I missed anything. It’s a great way to review (might be awkward if you have roommates, but mine is used to my impromptu lectures by now!). 

For a minute I thought to myself “who the fuck has that much time for their notes during class”. Then I realized that this is for compiling your nonsense non-readable notes from class into valuable worksheets. This is how I study for everything ever and it is super useful! Usually, I simplify my class notes this way and keep the worksheets for years. They are good reference tools. 

(via anthropologyadventures)

576 notes

jangojips:

valdanderthal:

macabre-mind-94:

Differences between male and female skulls.

Some of this stuff overlaps into ancestry as well but it’s a good quick guide 

In GENERAL, males have more pronounced, robust cranial features. It is important to remember that there is a lot of overlap in reality, and many skulls are ambiguous or have a percentage of uncertainty!

Everyone should remember that this can vary by ancestral background as well. Some of the criteria used to determine ancestry and the criteria for sex estimation overlap. 

jangojips:

valdanderthal:

macabre-mind-94:

Differences between male and female skulls.

Some of this stuff overlaps into ancestry as well but it’s a good quick guide 

In GENERAL, males have more pronounced, robust cranial features. It is important to remember that there is a lot of overlap in reality, and many skulls are ambiguous or have a percentage of uncertainty!

Everyone should remember that this can vary by ancestral background as well. Some of the criteria used to determine ancestry and the criteria for sex estimation overlap. 

(via dead-men-talking)

997 notes

ancient-mesopotamia:

The figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar, Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war, or Ishtar’s sister and rival, the goddess Ereshkigal who ruled over the Underworld, or the demoness Lilitu, known in the Bible as Lilith. The plaque probably stood in a shrine. 
Old Babylonian era, 1800-1750 BCE, from southern Iraq (place of excavation is unknown), Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London).

ancient-mesopotamia:

The figure could be an aspect of the goddess Ishtar, Mesopotamian goddess of sexual love and war, or Ishtar’s sister and rival, the goddess Ereshkigal who ruled over the Underworld, or the demoness Lilitu, known in the Bible as Lilith. The plaque probably stood in a shrine. 

Old Babylonian era, 1800-1750 BCE, from southern Iraq (place of excavation is unknown), Mesopotamia, Iraq. (The British Museum, London).

(via bluecohosh)

41 notes

UT "Body Farm" founder critical of MH17 victim recovery

strangeremains:

Four days after a missile shot down Malaysia Flight 17 in Ukraine, the remains of some of the 298 victims are headed home.

Ukrainian separatists agreed Monday with Malaysia to let a train with some of the bodies to leave the crash region for Amsterdam where the flight originated. President Obama is accusing the pro-Russian rebels of blocking the investigation by denying experts safe access to the crash scene.

If anyone knows about the science and challenges of recovering and identifying bodies, it is Dr. Bill Bass. The retired founder of the University of Tennessee’s “Body Farm” is one of the top forensic anthropologists in the world. Bass said he has paid close attention to the coverage of the crash site.

"I’ve been keeping up with it every time I turn on the television. Anytime you have an aircraft crash, you’re getting into my area," said Bass. "As a forensic anthropologist, my job in a situation like this would be to identify the individuals. From what I’ve seen, the crash scene and the debris field has already been extremely compromised."

Bass has worked to train FBI disaster response and recovery teams for 17 years. He says the first rule is to secure the scene of a crime or disaster.

Read more at WBIR.com

(via dead-men-talking)