Oh So Anthropological

Your source for all things Anthropology

189 notes

theolduvaigorge:

Contemplating an alt-ac career? Looking to get out of the academy altogether? Already made an interesting career move that worked out? Talk about it here on our new Flexible Academics support group

  • by Dr. Elizabeth Keenan (Fordham University)

"These days, everyone knows academia is a bad boyfriend (or girlfriend, depending on your sexual preference). Everyone has their own tale about how it keeps pulling them back in, with tantalizing offers of interviews and seductive whispers of funding, and then crushing their hopes into the tiny shards of a broken career.

This isn’t one of those columns. No, this is a column about having “The Talk.” Not the imaginary one you have with the academy itself—the one in which you finally kick it to the curb. I mean the one you’ll have repeatedly with everyone you’ve known professionally in the past decade of your life.

See, there’s a difference between bad relationships and academia. When you finally escape a bad relationship, most of your friends will suddenly confess, “I never liked him/her anyway!” Or they’ll join you in a round (or six) while you cry in your beer. They won’t tell you, “Well, why don’t you just give it another year? He’s a really nice guy when he isn’t ignoring you!” Or: “Surely if you just tried to make it work, she would stop cheating.”

And yet, in academia, you hear those things all the time. As soon as you tell someone, “I’m thinking of leaving,” they’ll come back at you with a list of reasons you should stay, give it another year, try harder, and maybe a job will open up. People who try to keep you in academia mean well: Either they have succeeded and don’t understand why you haven’t, or they’re in the same position as you and they’re terrified of leaving. But that doesn’t make talking to them any easier.

This can make the transition out of academia cripplingly lonely, especially if a lot of your friends and mentors are still on the inside. (And then there’s the problem that your friends outside academia won’t be able to relate, though they will try. At least some of them will buy you drinks.)” (read more).

***The problem is, whenever I think I’ll stay out for good, I realise that finding a non-academic job that’s an actual career job, not just a pay the rent and hope for the best job, is no easier to find than an academic job. 

(Source: Vitae)

(via theladygoogle)

55,614 notes

mydrunkkitchen:

terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.
Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.
Read more | Follow policymic


SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

READY NOT READY SO READY

mydrunkkitchen:

terrakion:

policymic:

Dreamworks is doing something even Pixar hasn’t tried: A black female heroine

DreamWorks Animation Studios has announced the addition of a black female heroine (gasp!) to its repertoire of white dogs, green ogres, snails, Neanderthals, pandas, white people and Antz. In doing so, it joins an elite club consisting of … well, nobody.

Not one major Hollywood studio has released a 3D animated feature starring a black character.

Read more | Follow policymic

SHES VOICED BY RIHANNA

READY NOT READY SO READY

301,420 notes

jazzminas:

miss-love:

mattrenez:

igotaloveshekeepsmewaiting:

melodiesintheair:

jarpadd:

I suggest all females watch this. 

*i suggest all humans watch this.

THIS SHOULD BE REQUIRED WATCHING FOR ALL HUMANS

I’m a 17 year old white guy living in middle class America. I’ve never exactly been a supporter of feminism because that kind of thing has never really affected me personally. I don’t notice it and I don’t care about it. But in nine minutes this video has made what is truly a serious problem extremely apparent. Those “why I need feminism” posts or those slut-shaming or rape culture campaigns never convince me of anything. But this video actually did I think.

tl;dr This video kicks ass, just watch it.

Stop what you’re doing and watch this

I watched this with my mom. This is really great. I love this.

(Source: dave-bowman, via 19thschuylerplace)

75,959 notes

ted:

Adrianne Haslet-Davis dances again for the first time since the Boston terrorist attack last year. 

When the bombs went off at the Boston Marathon finish line, Adrianne Haslet-Davis lost the lower half of her left leg in the explosion. She’s a ballroom dance teacher, and she assumed she would never dance again. With most prosthetics, she wouldn’t.

But Hugh Herr, of the MIT Media Lab, wanted to find a way to help her. He created a bionic limb specifically for dancers, studying the way they move and adapting the limb to fit their motion. (He explains how he did it here.)

At TED2014, Adrianne danced for the first time since the attack, wearing the bionic limb that Hugh created for her.  

Hugh says, “It was 3.5 seconds between the bomb blasts in the Boston terrorist attack. In 3.5 seconds, the criminals and cowards took Adrianne off the dance floor. In 200 days, we put her back. We will not be intimidated, brought down, diminished, conquered or stopped by acts of violence.”

Amen to that, Hugh. 

Watch the full talk and performance here »

(via ohmythoughtsiconfess)

Filed under science man it is amazing the things we can do

83 notes

Anthropological Theories: A Guide by University of Alabama Students

webs-of-significance:

The University of Alabama Department of Anthropology’s website provides detailed, peer-created explanations of the development, central concerns, and major figures and works of the various anthropological theories. 

This is an unparalleled resource, and a great stop for anyone looking for an explanation of theory on-the-go.

(via anthropologyadventures)

242 notes

theolduvaigorge:

The science of anatomy is undergoing a revival

  • by John R. Hutchinson, Professor of Evolutionary Biomechanics

Only two decades ago, when I was starting my PhD studies at the University of California in Berkeley, there was talk about the death of anatomy as a research subject. That hasn’t happened. Instead the science of anatomy has undergone a renaissance lately, sparking renewed interest not just among researchers but also the public.

I may be biased, but examples from my own work, which is a small part of anatomical research, might showcase what I mean. In 2011, my team found out found why elephants have a false “sixth toe”, which had remained a mystery since it was first mentioned in 1710. Last year, with University of Utah researchers, I helped reveal that crocodiles have “bird-like” lungs in which air flows in a one-way loop rather than tidally back and forth as in mammalian lungs. Subsequent work by those colleagues has shown that monitor lizards do this, too.

Researchers have also solved the mystery of how monitor lizards got venom glands. They have discovered that lunge-feeding whales have a special sense organ in their chin that helps them engulf vast amounts of food. And like the whales, it seems crocodiles have sense organs in their jaws, which can detect vibrations in the water. Anatomy has even found gears in nature. Turns out that leafhopper insects have tiny gears in their legs that help in making astounding and precise leaps.

If the scientific examples weren’t enough, there are many from popular TV. British viewers have had the delights of anatomy served to them in a BBC TV series called Secrets of Bones, which concluded in March. American viewers are getting anatomical insights in Your Inner Fish, an ongoing TV series on PBS.

Anatomy’s highs and lows

Apart from an anomalous period in the 20th century, such discoveries have always captivated scientists and the public. From the 16th century until the 19th century, human anatomy was one of the top research fields. Anatomist Jean Francois Fernel, who invented the word “physiology”, wrote in 1542:

Anatomy is to physiology as geography is to history; it describes the theatre of events.

This analogy justified the study of anatomy for many early scientists, some of whom also sought to understand it to bring them closer to understanding the nature of God. Anatomy gained impetus, even catapulting scientists such as Thomas Henry Huxley (“Darwin’s bulldog”) into celebrity status, from the realisation that organisms had a common evolutionary history and thus their anatomy did too. Comparative anatomy became a central focus of evolutionary biology” (read more).

***A fun read.

(Source: The Conversation)

(via theladygoogle)

49 notes

Why Anthropologists Join An Ebola Outbreak Team

zomganthro:

Health specialists work in an isolation ward for patients in Guékedou, southern Guinea.

3,354 notes

s-c-i-guy:

Women in Science Interactive

Women in Science, a new interactive tool, presents the latest available data for countries at all stages of development. Produced by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, the tool lets you explore and visualize gender gaps in the pipeline leading to a research career, from the decision to get a doctorate degree to the fields of research women pursue and the sectors in which they work.

source

(via women-in-science)